Main Types of Artificial Limbs (Prosthesis)

Types of Artificial Limbs

An artificial limb is a type of prosthesis that replaces a missing extremity, such as arms or legs.

The type of artificial limb used is determined largely by the extent of an amputation or loss and location of the missing extremity. Artificial limbs may be needed for a variety of reasons, including disease, accidents, and congenital defects. Inside the body, artificial heart valves are in common use with artificial hearts and lungs seeing less common use but under active technology development. Other medical devices and aids that can be considered prosthetics include artificial eyes, palatal obturator, gastric bands, and dentures.

C-leg prosthesis

C-Leg 4 is an advanced microprocessor prosthetic for above-knee amputees that offers increased stability and control. With sophisticated gyroscope sensors, C-Leg 4 is able to make precise adjustments at every step, providing support and balance to help reduce the risk of trips and falls regardless of speed or terrain.

A transradial prosthesis is an artificial limb that replaces an arm missing below the elbow. Two main types of prosthetics are available. Cable operated limbs work by attaching a harness and cable around the opposite shoulder of the damaged arm. The other form of prosthetics available are myoelectric arms. These work by sensing, via electrodes, when the muscles in the upper arm moves, causing an artificial hand to open or close.

Transhumeral Prosthesis

transhumeral prosthesis helps to replace the function of a missing anatomical segment(s) from below the shoulder to (and including) the hand. How it is powered.

Type of control system for these prostheses are dependent on the needs, functions, and goals of each patient.

Transhumeral amputees experience some of the same problems as transfemoral amputees, due to the similar complexities associated with the movement of the elbow. This makes mimicking the correct motion with an artificial limb very difficult.

Transtibial Prosthesis

A transtibial prosthesis replaces the function of missing anatomical segment(s) from below the knee to the floor. This excludes partial feet . The way we do it. The prosthetic socket is the main connection between the residual limb and the prosthesis.

Transtibial amputees are usually able to regain normal movement more readily than someone with a transfemoral amputation, due in large part to retaining the knee, which allows for easier movement.

Transfemoral Prosthesis

A trans-femoral prosthesis is an artificial limb that replaces any amputated limb above the knee. The prosthesis is made from a high-quality raw material known as polypropylene. It has several components which fit together to construct the final piece.

Transfemoral amputees can have a very difficult time regaining normal movement. In general, a transfemoral amputee must use approximately 80% more energy to walk than a person with two whole legs. This is due to the complexities in movement associated with the knee. In newer and more improved designs, after employing hydraulics, carbon fiber, mechanical linkages, motors, computer microprocessors, and innovative combinations of these technologies to give more control to the user.

There are several areas of technology that have advanced significantly in recent years and are showing considerable potential. Robotic limbs and direct bone attachment are two new technologies that have made tremendous gains recently.

Quick Facts Regarding Prosthetics

Well designed prosthetics deliver both functionality and are cosmetically pleasing, but it also serves to complete the amputee’s sense of wholeness. A prosthesis provides mobility as well as emotional comfort, and so the history of prosthetics is not only a scientific history, but the story of human beings since the dawn of civilization who by birth, wound, or accident were left with a missing limb.

The earliest example of a prosthesis ever discovered is not a leg, arm, or even a fake eye, it’s a toe. A big toe, belonging to a noblewoman, was found in Egypt and dated to between 950-710 B.C.E. We all know that toes are important, but it’s interesting that our earliest physical example of the history of prosthetics is a toe and not something that might seem more important, like a leg or an arm. The big toe was particularly important to an Egyptian because it was necessary in order to wear the traditional Egyptian sandals. Worn nearly 3,000 years ago, this toe is a representation of the history of prosthetics being as much about function as identity.

These highly advanced devices can respond to commands from the central nervous system, more closely approximating normal movement and utility than older prostheses.

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